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The Global Plant Council (GPC) is a coalition of national, regional and international societies and affiliates representing plant, crop and agricultural and environmental sciences across the globe.

The GPC seeks to bring together all those involved in plant and crop research, education and training, to facilitate the development of plant science for global challenges such as world hunger, energy, climate change, health and well-being, sustainability and environmental protection.

News

Discovery of new ginger species spices up African wildlife surveys

Scientists from Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) have discovered a new species of wild ginger, spicing up a wave of recent wildlife discoveries in the Kabobo Massif - a rugged, mountainous region in Democratic Republic of Congo.


Strong interaction between herbivores and plants

In the past decades, we have seen a dramatic decline in biodiversity around the world. Every day, species are irrecoverably lost on an unprecedented scale. This also has an impact on the stability and productivity of ecosystems. Hence it is indispensable to understand the mechanisms that impact biodiversity, particularly in the case of primary producers such as algae and plants that form the basis of nearly all natural food webs and ecosystems.


Events

Learning, action research and outreach – Making higher education boost food security

Wageningen, the Netherlands

As a professional in tertiary agricultural education you are expected to prepare competent graduates for the job market. In addition, you are requested to do action research that contributes to innovation for food security, and provide services for rural communities that support inclusive development.


2nd Agriculture and Climate Change Conference

Meliá Sitges, Sitges (near Barcelona), Spain

Maintaining crop production to feed a growing population during a period of climate change is the greatest challenge we face as a species. The increased crop yields during the last century and especially the Green Revolution, were brought about through breeding for increased harvest index and disease resistance, as well as by using more irrigation water and agrochemicals. Improved cultivars were adopted readily during this period of relative climate stability. While genetic gains continue, albeit at reduced rates, productivity is in decline in many regions. Given the multiple challenges of climate change, reduced water supplies, and declining soil fertility in many regions, new approaches to produce climate resilient crops are desperately needed.


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