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Registration now open for GPC/SEB Plant Section Symposium on Stress Resilience

The Global Plant Council is pleased to announce that registration is now open for its Symposium on Stress Resilience, which takes place on 23–25th October 2015, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil. This event is organized in collaboration with the Society for Experimental Biology's Plant Section.

This Symposium aims to bring together experts from across the world to discuss current research efforts in plant stress resilience, showcase new approaches and technologies and build new networks and collaborations that will contribute to global efforts to develop crops that are better able to deal with fluctuating and stressful environmental conditions.

Information about the Symposium can be found here, and the preliminary programme is here.

To register for the conference, please click here - register by 3rd September 2015 to save £100!

To submit an abstract for the meeting, please click here - the deadline for abstract submission is 21st August 2015.

This event immediately precedes the International Plant Molecular Biology conference (25–30 October), also in Foz do Iguacu, and which also includes several sessions on stress. Why not combine the two meetings to make the most of your trip to Brazil?

Please a poster and a copy of the preliminary program can be downloaded from the links on the right - please do share these with interested colleagues. If you have any questions, please contact GPC Executive Director Ruth Bastow: [email protected].

Attachments

StressResilienceSymposiumProgramme.pdf
A4 poster Plant Symposium Save The Day.pdf

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