GPC Members Login
If you have any problems or have forgotten your login please contact [email protected]

Quantifying the greenhouse gas footprint of crop cultivation

"Climate-smart" crop cultivation, characterized by a low greenhouse gas (GHG) footprint, low synthetic nitrogen consumption, and simultaneously high yields, is an approach in agriculture for implementing the Paris Agreement as part of mitigating climate change. The GHG footprint is an index used to indicate the climate change impact potential exerted by crop production. It is therefore crucial to accurately quantify the GHG footprints of crop cultivation systems. However, severe problems or drawbacks in the quantification of GHG footprints still exist, which has limited the applicability of the GHG footprint in crop cultivation.

To solve these problems or drawbacks, in a recently published study in Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters, Prof. ZHENG Xunhua and her coauthor from the Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, proposed a generic methodological framework to quantify the GHG footprints of crop cultivation systems free from grazing.

"The current framework can more completely take into account the direct/indirect contributors in quantifying the GHG emissions and/or uptakes within a crop-production life cycle. In addition, it provides example values of some GHG emission factors while emphasizing the combination of direct measurements and model simulations in determining other key parameters," explains ZHENG. "And we hope that this methodological framework can support different studies to obtain comparable values of GHG footprints, which may be the key parameters for determining the green value added tax of foods in implementing the Paris Agreement."

Read the paper: A generic methodological framework for accurately quantifying greenhouse gas footprints of crop cultivation systems.

Article source: Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

Image credit: ZHENG Xunhua


Amazon deforestation is close to tipping point

Deforestation of the Amazon is about to reach a threshold beyond which the region's tropical rainforest may undergo irreversible changes that transform the landscape into degraded savanna with sparse shrubby plant cover and low biodiversity.

Palm trees are spreading northward. How far will they go?

What does it take for palm trees, the unofficial trademark of tropical landscapes, to expand into northern parts of the world that have long been too cold for palm trees to survive? A new study, led by Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory researcher Tammo Reichgelt, attempts to answer this question. He and his colleagues analyzed a broad dataset to determine global palm tree distribution in relation to temperature.

Agriculture initiated by indigenous peoples, not Fertile Crescent migration

Small scale agricultural farming was first initiated by indigenous communities living on Turkey's Anatolian plateau, and not introduced by migrant farmers as previously thought, according to new research by the University of Liverpool.