Login

GPC Members Login
If you have any problems or have forgotten your login please contact [email protected]


Inclusion of a crop model in a climate model to promote climate modeling

Crop models are parameterization schemes that simulate the processes of crop development and production. Their inclusion in climate models can promote the simulation ability of climate models, according to Dr. Zou Jing at the Institute of Oceanographic Instrumentation, Qilu University of Technology.

ZOU and his co-researchers from the Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences/Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences/Zhejiang Institute of Meteorological Sciences, developed a new crop–climate coupled model and published their results on its evaluation in Advances of Atmospheric Sciences.

"Most previous studies coupled a single crop model into a climate model,” explains Dr. Zou, “but we considered three crop types with different farming systems in this study. We chose rice, wheat and maize, which cover 81% of the cereal-crop planting area in China. We further distinguished these crops in terms of different farming systems to provide more detailed descriptions about the actual crop planting. For example, winter wheat and spring wheat are different in our model,” he adds.

According to their findings, the new crop–climate model has an excellent ability in simulating crop phenology, and offers a slight correction of the bias in the original climate model in some typical areas.

“Our new model provides a good tool to investigate the relationship between crop development and climate change for global change studies,” says Dr. Zou. “The expectation is that the model can be applied in food production or agricultural research, if further promotion of the model’s accuracy and parameter optimization is achieved in future work,” he adds.

Read the paper: Advances of Atmospheric Sciences

Article source: Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences

Image credit: WikiImages/ Pixabay

News

To protect stem cells, plants have diverse genetic backup plans

Despite evolution driving a wide variety of differences, many plants function the same way. Now a new study has revealed the different genetic strategies various flowering plant species use to achieve the same status quo.


Scientists crack the code to regenerate plant tissues

Plant regeneration can occur via formation of a mass of pluripotent cells. The process of acquisition of pluripotency involves silencing of genes to remove original tissue memory and priming for activation by external input. Led by Professor Sachihiro Matsunaga from Tokyo University of Science, a team of scientists have shown that plant regenerative capacity requires a certain demethylase that can prime gene expression in response to regenerative cues.


Pollen Genes Mutate Naturally in Only Some Strains of Corn

Pollen genes mutate naturally in only some strains of corn, according to Rutgers-led research that helps explain the genetic instability in certain strains and may lead to better breeding of corn and other crops.