Login


Background

Plant Science for Global Challenges

Feeding the world’s rapidly growing human population is one of the most urgent global challenges of our time. By 2050 it is predicted there will be over 9 billion people on the planet.

To meet the needs of a growing population we not only need to produce more food, but more accessible, reliable, and nutritious food. We need our crops to thrive in more challenging climates, and be resilient to new pests and diseases. We need renewable energy sources to reduce our reliance on fossil fuels, and novel plant-based materials for industry. We need all of these things without placing more pressure on already limited natural resources.

Plant science has a critical role to play if we are to meet food security and other challenges, and the Global Plant Council is here to help.

The Global Plant Council was founded in 2009 to provide a body that can speak with a single, strong voice in the policy and decision-making arena, and to promote plant science research and teaching around the world.

If you would like to keep up to date with the information posted on this website please sign up for our monthly e-Bulletin by clicking here and completing the form. Alternatively, please contact us at [email protected].

News

How plants form their sugar transport routes

In experiments on transport tissues in plants, researchers from Heidelberg University were able to identify factors of crucial importance for the formation of the plant tissue known as phloem. According to Prof. Dr Thomas Greb of the Centre for Organismal Studies (COS), these factors differ from all previously known factors that trigger the specification of cells. The findings of the Heidelberg researchers substantially expand our understanding of the metabolic processes in plants. Their results were published in the journal Current Biology.


Scientists examine impact of high-severity fires on conifer forests

The ability of some Western conifer forests to recover after severe fire may become increasingly limited as the climate continues to warm, scientists from the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) and Harvard Forest found in a new study published in Global Change Biology. Although most of these cone-bearing evergreen trees are well adapted to fire, the study examines whether two likely facets of climate change -- hotter, drier conditions and larger, more frequent and severe wildfires -- could potentially transform landscapes from forested to shrub-dominated systems.


From Elsevier: 200 Years of Flora - free access to all articles

2018 will mark the 200th anniversary of the journal Flora. To kickstart the celebrations, all journals in the Elsevier archives have been scanned and have been added to ScienceDirect. Articles published before 1905 are available via the Biodiversity Library, and all articles from 1905 onwards are freely available via ScienceDirect until March 2020 and can be accessed through this page: https://www.journals.elsevier.com/flora/news/200-years-of-flora-free-access-to-all-articles.