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Plant Science for Global Challenges

Feeding the world’s rapidly growing human population is one of the most urgent global challenges of our time. By 2050 it is predicted there will be over 9 billion people on the planet.

To meet the needs of a growing population we not only need to produce more food, but more accessible, reliable, and nutritious food. We need our crops to thrive in more challenging climates, and be resilient to new pests and diseases. We need renewable energy sources to reduce our reliance on fossil fuels, and novel plant-based materials for industry. We need all of these things without placing more pressure on already limited natural resources.

Plant science has a critical role to play if we are to meet food security and other challenges, and the Global Plant Council is here to help.

The Global Plant Council was founded in 2009 to provide a body that can speak with a single, strong voice in the policy and decision-making arena, and to promote plant science research and teaching around the world.

If you would like to keep up to date with the information posted on this website please sign up for our monthly e-Bulletin by clicking here and completing the form. Alternatively, please contact us at [email protected].

News

Sweet bribes for ants are key to crops bearing fruit, study shows

Flowering crops such as beans and cotton offer their sweetest nectar to recruit colonizing ants in a strategy that balances their need for defense and to reproduce, research suggests.


Australian origin likely for iconic New Zealand tree

Ancestors of the iconic New Zealand Christmas Tree, Pōhutukawa, may have originated in Australia, new fossil research from the University of Adelaide suggests.


Plants sacrifice “daughters” to survive chilly weather

Plants adopt different strategies to survive the changing temperatures of their natural environments. This is most evident in temperate regions where forest trees shed their leaves to conserve energy during the cold season. In a new study, a team of plant biologists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) found that some plants may selectively kill part of their roots to survive under cold weather conditions.