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Background

Plant Science for Global Challenges

Feeding the world’s rapidly growing human population is one of the most urgent global challenges of our time. By 2050 it is predicted there will be over 9 billion people on the planet.

To meet the needs of a growing population we not only need to produce more food, but more accessible, reliable, and nutritious food. We need our crops to thrive in more challenging climates, and be resilient to new pests and diseases. We need renewable energy sources to reduce our reliance on fossil fuels, and novel plant-based materials for industry. We need all of these things without placing more pressure on already limited natural resources.

Plant science has a critical role to play if we are to meet food security and other challenges, and the Global Plant Council is here to help.

The Global Plant Council was founded in 2009 to provide a body that can speak with a single, strong voice in the policy and decision-making arena, and to promote plant science research and teaching around the world.

If you would like to keep up to date with the information posted on this website please sign up for our monthly e-Bulletin by clicking here and completing the form. Alternatively, please contact us at [email protected].

For our latest Annual Report (2017-2018), please click the link below:
GPC Annual Report 2017-2018.pdf.

News

Nature's 'laboratory' offers clues on how plants thrive through genetic diversity

Scientists have turned to nature’s own ‘laboratory’ for clues about how plants adapt in the environment to ensure their own survival.


Global warming increases frost damage on trees in Central Europe

Global warming increases frost damage on trees in large areas of Central Europe, according to a new Finnish-Chinese study by researchers from the University of Eastern Finland, the Chinese Academy of Science and Zhejiang A&F University.


The African Orphan Crops Consortium bears its first fruits

New research published describes and releases the first five orphan crop genomes from an international project to boost the productivity of traditional African food supplies.