Login

GPC Members Login
If you have any problems or have forgotten your login please contact [email protected]


About GPC

Mission

  • To facilitate the development of plant science for global challenges.

  • To foster international collaborations and enable the effective use of knowledge and resources.

  • To provide an independent and inclusive forum to bring together all those involved in plant and crop research, education and training.

Core Values

  • To be an organization that is based in plant and crop science.

  • To facilitate collaboration across geographic and scientific borders.

  • Inclusion and equity.

  • To speak with a single, strong voice for all those working in plant, crop, agricultural and environmental science across the globe.

Vision 2015–2018

  • To act as a “catalyst” within the global plant science community, and between scientists and other influencers, to promote collaborations and increase awareness of the key role plant science plays in all of our lives.

  • To provide a knowledgeable, curated source of relevant and useful plant science information on a global basis.

  • To facilitate science-based initiatives that will help close the gap between basic research and applied innovations.

  • To deliver increased value to the GPC member organizations and affiliates.

Priorities

To help identify and coordinate strategic solutions to global challenges, GPC is focusing on the following priority areas:

Initiatives

Within these areas the Global Plant Council focuses on specific initiatives to identify key challenges, evaluate ongoing research programs, identify gaps, prevent duplication of efforts and funding, and facilitate urgently required global strategic programs.

Constitution and Bylaws

If you'd like to read more about the structure and workings of the GPC, please find our Constitution and Bylaws below:

Constitution and Bylaws (updated 2018)

News

Scientists engineer shortcut for photosynthetic glitch, boost crop growth 40%

Plants convert sunlight into energy through photosynthesis; however, most crops on the planet are plagued by a photosynthetic glitch, and to deal with it, evolved an energy-expensive process called photorespiration that drastically suppresses their yield potential. Researchers from the University of Illinois and U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service report in the journal Science that crops engineered with a photorespiratory shortcut are 40 percent more productive in real-world agronomic conditions.


Should researchers engineer a spicy tomato?

The chili pepper, from an evolutionary perspective, is the tomato's long-lost spitfire cousin. They split off from a common ancestor 19 million years ago but still share some of the same DNA. While the tomato plant went on to have a fleshy, nutrient-rich fruit yielding bountiful harvests, the more agriculturally difficult chili plant went defensive, developing capsaicinoids, the molecules that give peppers their spiciness, to ward off predators.


European wheat lacks climate resilience

The climate is not only warming, it is also becoming more variable and extreme. Such unpredictable weather can weaken global food security if major crops such as wheat are not sufficiently resilient – and if we are not properly prepared.