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About GPC

Mission

  • To facilitate the development of plant science for global challenges.

  • To foster international collaborations and enable the effective use of knowledge and resources.

  • To provide an independent and inclusive forum to bring together all those involved in plant and crop research, education and training.

Core Values

  • To be an organization that is based in plant and crop science.

  • To facilitate collaboration across geographic and scientific borders.

  • Inclusion and equity.

  • To speak with a single, strong voice for all those working in plant, crop, agricultural and environmental science across the globe.

Vision 2015–2018

  • To act as a “catalyst” within the global plant science community, and between scientists and other influencers, to promote collaborations and increase awareness of the key role plant science plays in all of our lives.

  • To provide a knowledgeable, curated source of relevant and useful plant science information on a global basis.

  • To facilitate science-based initiatives that will help close the gap between basic research and applied innovations.

  • To deliver increased value to the GPC member organizations and affiliates.

Priorities

To help identify and coordinate strategic solutions to global challenges, GPC is focusing on the following priority areas:

Initiatives

Within these areas the Global Plant Council focuses on specific initiatives to identify key challenges, evaluate ongoing research programs, identify gaps, prevent duplication of efforts and funding, and facilitate urgently required global strategic programs.

Constitution and Bylaws

If you'd like to read more about the structure and workings of the GPC, please find our Constitution and Bylaws below:

Constitution and Bylaws (updated 2018)

News

Scientists transform tobacco info factory for high-value proteins

For thousands of years, plants have produced food for humans, but with genetic tweaks, they can also manufacture proteins like Ebola vaccines, antibodies to combat a range of conditions, and now, cellulase that is used in food processing and to break down crop waste to create biofuel. In Nature Plants, a team from Cornell University and the University of Illinois announced that crops can cheaply manufacture proteins inside their cellular power plants called chloroplasts—allowing the crops to be grown widely in fields rather than restrictive greenhouses—with no cost to yield.


Climate change could affect symbiotic relationships between microorganisms and trees

Some fungi and bacteria live in close association, or symbiosis, with tree roots in forest soil to obtain mutual benefits. The microorganisms help trees access water and nutrients from the atmosphere or soil, sequester carbon, and withstand the effects of climate change. In exchange, they receive carbohydrates, which are essential to their development and are produced by the trees during photosynthesis.


Aggressive, non-native wetland plants squelch species richness more than dominant natives do

Dominant, non-native plants reduce wetland biodiversity and abundance more than native plants do, researchers report in the journal Ecology Letters. Even native plants that dominate wetland landscapes play better with others, the team found.