Login


About GPC

Mission

  • To facilitate the development of plant science for global challenges.

  • To foster international collaborations and enable the effective use of knowledge and resources.

  • To provide an independent and inclusive forum to bring together all those involved in plant and crop research, education and training.

Core Values

  • To be an organization that is based in plant and crop science.

  • To facilitate collaboration across geographic and scientific borders.

  • Inclusion and equity.

  • To speak with a single, strong voice for all those working in plant, crop, agricultural and environmental science across the globe.

Vision 2015–2018

  • To act as a “catalyst” within the global plant science community, and between scientists and other influencers, to promote collaborations and increase awareness of the key role plant science plays in all of our lives.

  • To provide a knowledgeable, curated source of relevant and useful plant science information on a global basis.

  • To facilitate science-based initiatives that will help close the gap between basic research and applied innovations.

  • To deliver increased value to the GPC member organizations and affiliates.

Priorities

To help identify and coordinate strategic solutions to global challenges, GPC is focusing on the following priority areas:

Initiatives

Within these areas the Global Plant Council focuses on specific initiatives to identify key challenges, evaluate ongoing research programs, identify gaps, prevent duplication of efforts and funding, and facilitate urgently required global strategic programs.

News

How plants form their sugar transport routes

In experiments on transport tissues in plants, researchers from Heidelberg University were able to identify factors of crucial importance for the formation of the plant tissue known as phloem. According to Prof. Dr Thomas Greb of the Centre for Organismal Studies (COS), these factors differ from all previously known factors that trigger the specification of cells. The findings of the Heidelberg researchers substantially expand our understanding of the metabolic processes in plants. Their results were published in the journal Current Biology.


Scientists examine impact of high-severity fires on conifer forests

The ability of some Western conifer forests to recover after severe fire may become increasingly limited as the climate continues to warm, scientists from the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) and Harvard Forest found in a new study published in Global Change Biology. Although most of these cone-bearing evergreen trees are well adapted to fire, the study examines whether two likely facets of climate change -- hotter, drier conditions and larger, more frequent and severe wildfires -- could potentially transform landscapes from forested to shrub-dominated systems.


From Elsevier: 200 Years of Flora - free access to all articles

2018 will mark the 200th anniversary of the journal Flora. To kickstart the celebrations, all journals in the Elsevier archives have been scanned and have been added to ScienceDirect. Articles published before 1905 are available via the Biodiversity Library, and all articles from 1905 onwards are freely available via ScienceDirect until March 2020 and can be accessed through this page: https://www.journals.elsevier.com/flora/news/200-years-of-flora-free-access-to-all-articles.